Residents Speak Out About Beebe & Gebhard Road Safety Concerns

, Written by Christine Pitawanich, Posted: Mon, April 9 2012 at 6:32 PM, Updated: Mon, April 9 2012 at 8:49 PM

Extremely dangerous, that's what Central Point residents are saying about the section of road where Beebe turns into Gebhard.

"This road needs help, it really does, it needs help," said nearby resident Hollie Wessling.

"It is a very dangerous road honestly, I wish there were sidewalks, I wish it was widened, some of my neighbors have almost run me off the road, especially down at that corner," said Summer Mistretta, who lives in a subdevelopment off of Gebhard.

On Sunday, 30-year-old Jessie Boyd lost his life while riding a motorcycle. Police said he lost control as he rounded the curve between Beebe and Gebhard. 

"Yesterday when I heard about the accident I was not surprised honestly [...] There definitely needs to be something, flashing lights, reflectors, something to warn someone that, that is something like a 90-degree corner," emphasized Mistretta.

However it's not just the corner that people are concerned about, it's the road itself.

"That road is so terrible and so narrow," began Wessling.

"The potholes on the sides of the roads are bigger than your tire so you have to drive down the middle of the road and get over if a car's coming, it's a dangerous road," she said.

Many residents said they refuse to drive Beebe and Gebhard Road at night because there are no street lights.

"I only go that way in the daytime," said Wessling.

But according to Mistretta, the road is always dangerous.

"Bottom line, it's a bad road day or night [...] a lot of cars travel very fast on it."

It's a road that's already claimed at least two lives. Residents in nearby sub-developments said they're scared that next time -- it could be a child.

A Jackson County official said the stretch of road has not had ongoing complaints. 

Officials said if residents want something to change they have to voice their concerns by contacting the county Roads Department or the Jackson County Commissioners.

About the Author

Christine Pitawanich

Christine Pitawanich was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest. In 2010, she received a master's degree in Broadcast Journalism from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University in New York.

Christine also has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications from the University of Washington.

Before joining the NBC5 News team, she had the opportunity to file reports from Washington D.C. for WFFT FOX Ft. Wayne News in Indiana. Christine has also interned at KOMO-TV in Seattle.

Christine loves to ski, try new food and have fun in the outdoors.

Catch Christine anchoring weekdays on NBC 5 News at 5pm.

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