Supreme Court To Rule on Affordable Care Act

, Written by Christine Pitawanich, Posted: Wed, June 27 2012 at 6:52 PM, Updated: Wed, June 27 2012 at 7:25 PM

When you ask people on the street if they're familiar, with the Affordable Care Act, many say they don't know much. It's a frequent response to a more than 2000-page law passed in 2010.

For mother, Kylee Van Syc, it's difficult to understand the issues.

"It's always confusing to me, everything's changing," said Van Syc.

Come Thursday, the healthcare climate could change even more when the Supreme Court rules on the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, also known as the ACA.

"Throwing out the ACA will be a huge setback, there will be hundreds of thousands of people in Oregon that could be getting healthcare that will not be if they throw it out," said Rich Rohde, Regional Organizer for Oregon Action.

"There are parts of the bill that are very good but then there are parts of the bill that are [...] very unconstitutional," said Oregon Representative Sal Esquivel.

At the center of the debate, a portion of the law, known as the individual mandate. It requires almost everyone to get insurance or get fined almost $700.

"The federal government is mandating to you that you will do this, you will do that, you will purchase this and I think that's not only highly unconstitutional, it's just wrong," said Rep. Esquivel.

However over at Oregon Action, Rohde said he disagrees.

"The mandate is really set up to keep people from just waiting till they get sick to then take advantage of healthcare we all pay for," said Rohde.

"We can make sure insurance companies are covering people regardless of their pre-existing conditions," he continued.

For mother Kylee, despite what the Supreme Court decides on Thursday...

"My main concern is for my son's future," began Van Syc.

"I want him to be healthy," she said.

It's a sentiment shared by the millions who are uninsured.

The Supreme Court will have the option to throw out just the individual mandate portion, the entire law, or keep it as is.

About the Author

Christine Pitawanich

Christine Pitawanich was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest. In 2010, she received a master's degree in Broadcast Journalism from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University in New York.

Christine also has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications from the University of Washington.

Before joining the NBC5 News team, she had the opportunity to file reports from Washington D.C. for WFFT FOX Ft. Wayne News in Indiana. Christine has also interned at KOMO-TV in Seattle.

Christine loves to ski, try new food and have fun in the outdoors.

Catch Christine anchoring weekdays on NBC 5 News at 5pm.

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