Voter Fraud Allegations Arise in Region

, Written by Christine Pitawanich, Posted: Mon, November 5 2012 at 5:48 PM, Updated: Mon, November 5 2012 at 9:20 PM

Allegations of voter fraud are flying as election day nears and the races heat up.

In Oregon, a Clackamas County election worker is accused of tampering with ballots.

She allegedly filled in Republican preferences on spaces voters left blank.

"I can't also talk about how she was caught, but what I can tell you is she was caught because of the security measures we have in place," said Oregon Secretary of State, Kate Brown.

Add to that, Roxanne Rubin, a Henderson, Nevada resident is also accused of committing voter fraud by voting twice.

"I think she was trying to prove that voter fraud was easy to accomplish and apparently she's wrong," said Ross Miller, Nevada Secretary of State.

They're just two instances of people allegedly taking matters too far into their own hands. Now the National Republican Party has alleged malfunctioning voting machines in a handful of states, including Nevada.

"We just think that sometimes technology malfunctions and so asking them to re-calibrate the machines," said Darren Littel with the Nevada Republican Party.

With all the contention around the election this year, political parties have poll watchers in place and rival parties are sending their own people to monitor the monitors.

And with the big day coming up, police are warning voters to think twice about doing something they shouldn't with ballots.

"Voter fraud is a very serious offense. It's actually a felony. You could go to prison for up to five years and then you can have up to a $5000 fine. Don't even consider it, it's not worth it," said Lt. Mike Budreau with the Medford Police Department.

It's a tense race to the White House, made more tense by the chaos expected at polling sites across the nation.

Of course it's all mail-in ballots in Oregon, but adding to the chaos in the rest of the nation, both the Obama and Romney camps have lawyers in place ready to challenge decisions by election supervisors in battleground states.

About the Author

Christine Pitawanich

Christine Pitawanich was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest. In 2010, she received a master's degree in Broadcast Journalism from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University in New York.

Christine also has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications from the University of Washington.

Before joining the NBC5 News team, she had the opportunity to file reports from Washington D.C. for WFFT FOX Ft. Wayne News in Indiana. Christine has also interned at KOMO-TV in Seattle.

Christine loves to ski, try new food and have fun in the outdoors.

Catch Christine anchoring weekdays on NBC 5 News at 5pm.

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