Oregon brewers call on Congress to protect state lands and waters

GRANTS PASS, Ore. – Earlier this week, we told you how many Oregon brewers were standing behind a new act making its way through the State Senate.

Wednesday, local brewery owners and activists got together to show their support for “The Oregon Wildlands Act.”

You can’t make beer, without clean water. The Oregon Wildlands Act aims to protect our water systems, by designating over 200 thousand acres of land to wilderness areas and over 250 miles to the scenic river system.

Over 50 brewers from around the state have already signed on to support this bill. Oregon’s beer industry is a big economic driver for the state. In 2016, over 19 million people visited an Oregon brewery, pub or taproom. The activists at Wednesday’s event say the craft beer industry can’t thrive without protected watersheds and clean water.

“There’s a really great community of people that value the outdoor recreation that we have and these rivers and they also come and recognize the connection to great beer,” Director of Native Fish Society, Jake Crawford said.

This was one of two events happening around the state to gather public support for the bill, the other in Portland. It featured speakers from around the area who know and shared the importance of protecting the watershed.

The group says their mission now is to get the word out to the public to stress the importance of preserving the Oregon wildlands.

Devin Gooden graduated from Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication with a Master’s degree in Sports Journalism.

She has spent most of her life in Atlanta, Georgia and received her undergraduate degree from the University of Georgia in Business Management.

When she’s not reporting, Devin practices yoga, reads thriller novels and loudly cheers for her beloved Georgia Bulldawgs.

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