Week 13: Garden Porch Plant Stand

Here at Habitat we get all kinds of things brought in.  Some in better shape than others.  The team was going to toss this chair because of the damage on the seat.  When I saw it, it was love!  I instantly started thinking of what else could it be.

So a garden plant stand it became!

Intermediate (only because I used the table saw to cut the shelf for the chair)

Time – 2 hours

Supplies-

Chair that the seat can be or has been removed
Sand paper – 220 grit
Paint brush
Acrylic paint
¼ in scrap of plywood
Small nails
Wood glue
Saw
Instructions-

  1. Start with removing the seat from the chair.  This was an old woven seat so when I removed all of the weaving the framework was open in the center.
  2. Lay ¼ in plywood on the bottom of the chair to create shelf.
  3. Draw outline of the shelf from the underside of the rungs.  This will help with the cutting of the shelf to fit.
  4. Cut board to fit.  I used a table saw but you can use a jig saw or skill depending what you have on hand.
  5. Measure where the holes will be to hold shelf to rungs and pre drill.  Do not go all the way through and be careful to not split the wood.
  6. Use wood glue and small nails to hold shelf in place.  It may take overnight for the glue to dry.
  7. After the shelf is dry, lightly sand edges smooth.
  8. Dust all areas of chair and shelf.
  9. Paint to your hearts content!  I used acrylic paint.  Squirted lots of colors and brush stroked them together.  Then used what was left of the mixture to paint a few areas of the chair structure to tie it all together.
  10. After it dries, clear coat with a Poly sealant spray.  Let dry.
  11. Add a decorative plant pot or basket and your favorite flowers.

 

If you are looking for a an item for a creative upcycle, Call Deana at Habitat 541-779-1983.  All projects that are completed are on display at the Restore for purchase.

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